INSIGHTS into upcoming films at Heartland Film Festival…

PRODUCE, written and directed by Chris Dowling, screens at Heartland FIlm Festival October 19, 20, 22, & 24.  

Produce “focuses on Calvin, a professional baseball player reeling from the curveball life has thrown him. Forced into an early retirement due to panic attacks, he sleepwalks through his days and struggles to raise his teenage daughter. But one day he suddenly feels awakened, his life invigorated by the most unlikely person: Produce, a kid with Down Syndrome who works at the local grocery store.” 

Festival goers will have a chance to engage with the film’s star David DeSanctis and producer Milan Chakraborty at screenings on the 19th and 20th. PRODUCE also screens October 22 & 24.  

Although writer/director Chris Dowling is not going to make it to the festival in person, 
O’Leary’s Reel Life caught up with him yesterday to talk about the making of the film. Here’s what he shared:

Chris Dowling, Produce writer/director

O’LRL: What’s at the heart of your film PRODUCE?

CD: Authentic characters trying to figure out life.  It’s a film that deals with things like addiction, faith and Downs Syndrome in a very organic and realistic way.  The theaters that we have screened at so far have been full of both laughter and tears…and that’s life.   

O’LRL: What inspired you to write and direct this story of an unlikely friendship between a former baseball player and a grocery store clerk with Down’s Syndrome?

CD: The true impetus was writing about Calvin’s (the baseball player) faith journey.  I am really captivated by the idea of attaining “childlike” faith.  I wanted to create a character that could have joy rooted in childlike faith…but yet would be overlooked by the general population.  It’s the idea of shattering stereotypes when we actually engage with people that are different than us.  The character of Produce becomes the most unlikely conduit for change in Calvin’s life.

O’LRL: Can you share about the process you went through to assemble your cast?

CD: We had two fantastic casting agents in LA that were looking out for us - Amber Horn and Danielle Aufiero.  They found us some great folks.  I think McKaley Miller was the first to come on board and she’s just so talented.  I knew Kris Polaha personally and knew he would nail the part of Calvin.  Once Kris was on board, it started to feel like family so we called other actors that we knew that we wanted to work with.  I couldn’t be more pleased with cast. They make me look very good as the director in this film.

David DeSanctis, who plays Produce, is unbelievable.  We had essentially an international casting call for the character.  I met with some very talented actors with Down’s Syndrome, but there was something about David…his personality was so dynamic.  He didn’t have the best audition, but he did have the biggest personality. Despite having never acted professionally, we gave him a lot of heavy lifting and he excelled.  

 O’LRL: During production did you find yourself adapting the script to incorporate insights the actors were bringing to their roles? Any stories you’d like to share about how that may have strengthened the final result?

CD: Absolutely.  I wanted the conversations to feel authentic so I was pretty free with the actors to make things their own.  Self-admittedly, Brooke Burns’ character Amy had little to do.  She came out and created this amazing backstory and threw herself into learning about AA and really making that a part of her character.  As an actor, Kris Polaha gave his character a secret that he wouldn’t tell me until after shooting was over. His character’s secret painted the way he looked at life.  

It’s all about collaboration.   If your have talented actors and let them explore things in the moment, I think they will come up with better stuff than what’s on the page.  

O’LRL: What has surprised you the most about audience response to the film?

CD: I haven’t really been surprised with the response we’ve seen, only humbled and overjoyed.  It’s just really exciting to know that the audience cares enough to go on the journey with these characters you created.  Lots of tears and laughter.  Again, a lot of that credit goes to the actors and their performances.  

O’LRL: Thanks for taking time to share with O’Leary’s Reel Life.   

Find out more about PRODUCE at the official website: 
http://www.iamproduce.com/

Chris Dowling Produce film festival down's syndrome baseball family interview

INSIGHTS into upcoming films at Heartland Film Festival…

Suzan Beraza’s documentary Uranium Drive-In poses the question:

"WHO DECIDES THE FUTURE OF RURAL AMERICA?"

Description of the film from Heartland Film Festival site:

A proposed uranium mill in southwestern Colorado – the first to be built in the US in 30 years – sparks an emotional debate, pitting a population desperate for jobs and financial stability against an environmental group based in a nearby resort town. Both sides of the issue are brought to life in heart-wrenching detail with conflicting opinions and visions for the future. Offering no easy answers, the film aims to capture personal stories and paint a portrait of the lives behind this nuanced and complex issue.

Watching the film I was reminded of the story of the blind men and the elephant.  Each experienced just one aspect of the elephant and came away with a very different assessment from the others.  

Looking at the proposed uranium mill from perspectives of promised jobs, environment health, etc each person Beraza interviewed brought a distinct perspective.  What everyone seemed to have in common was a commitment to their differing but very strong feelings and beliefs about what mattered and what would make things better going forward.  

There’s a feeling of sorrow lingering on the edges of this documentary.  I emerged from the film with a sense that the future for that region and the people in it is very much still to be revealed.  

Uranium Drive-In screens October 18, 20, 23, & 24 at Heartland Film Festival. 


Official Website: http://uraniumdrivein.com/

Heartland Film Festival Suzan Beraza Uranium Drive-In documentary woman director uranium environment film festival

INSIGHTS into upcoming films at Heartland Film Festival…
Katie and Matt Celia are coming to Indianapolis to share their  documentary OFF THE FLOOR with Heartland Film Festival goers: Saturday, Oct. 18 – 5:00 pm, AMC Traders Point Showplace 12. 

"The Celias (aka Butter&Sugar) are a husband & wife film-making team who love telling stories about dreamers and outsiders.”
"This is the inspiring true story of one dancer, Jessica Anderson-Gwin, and her struggle to find acceptance and respect for her art. Jessica and her dance company, Jagged, challenge audiences to embrace the artistic potential of vertical dance, a fusion of aerial pole fitness and traditional dance techniques."

This week Katie Celia took time out from packing and travel preparation to share some insights about co-creating the film with her husband and co-director/producer Matt.  Here’s what she had to share…
O’LRL: I read that you were inspired to create OFF THE FLOOR after attending the very first performance of Jagged’s innovative hybrid modern dance/pole dance work and being surprised by what you experienced. Can you share about the process of recognizing there was a documentary waiting to be born? How did the two of you explore the idea together and how did you reach out to Jessica Anderson-Gwin and the troupe to convince them to let you in to their world?

KC: Going into the show we had no idea we were about to see the subject of a documentary, we went simply to support a friend of mine who was in the show. But we knew right away that very night that this was something incredible. It was like being in the ocean and seeing the perfect wave forming in front of you. After the first dance number, Matt and I turned to each other and it was clear the light bulb had illuminated over both our heads. We were just so intrigued at the way Jessica had seamlessly combined two dance styles that we would have thought were contradictory but turned out to actually be very complimentary. As artists, we saw the vision it took to make that leap and were astonished we’d never seen it before. It’s rare to stumble on something new and fresh.
There really wasn’t much discussion, we were so curious and interested in the company that we had my friend get us into the wrap party that night and approached Jessica then and there. Of course as first time filmmakers we didn’t know where that road was going to lead, or that it would turn into a feature. We just thought she had an interesting story and perspective and wanted to see where it lead us.
Jessica is the most inclusive person I’ve ever met. She loves showing people her world because she is confident in who she is and the choices she makes. It’s one of the reasons you fall in love with her both in person and in the film. We talked to her the night of the show, took her out for pizza to get a little more backstory, and by our third meeting were filming rehearsals. She really didn’t need convincing. I think some of the other dancers were a little confused the first time we showed up because she forgot to tell them we were coming, but being performers they were fine with the camera being there.

O’LRL: OFF THE FLOOR at its heart feels like a story about tenacity in the face of seemingly insurmountable odds.  As the dance troupe struggled to shape their artistic vision and battle the strip club stigma were there ever times when you worried that the situation would implode leaving you without a satisfying arc for your documentary?  What kept you going? And what signaled to you that it was time to complete the film?

KC: Being around Jessica, you just can’t help but believe that one day pole dance will be as accepted as ballet and hip-hop. I know that sounds crazy, but her confidence is just that infectious. I think it was always shocking to us when that stigma would rear its ugly, because we couldn’t believe that others didn’t see pole dance the way we saw it. The funny thing is, it’s never during their self-produced show with live audiences where there’s a problem with perception. Yes, initially there’s this awed silence of people holding their breath, trying to comprehend what is going on, but soon you see the preconceptions melt away and then you have folks cheering and pulling out their phones to take photos and videos because it’s the coolest thing they’ve ever seen. We’ve seen it happen over and over again, and there’s never been an audience they haven’t won over. It’s on mainstream media where the stigma tends to come up, and that’s because it’s much easier to play the salacious angle then to dive deeper and show how pole has evolved. It was very frustrating to witness that disconnect. It made us all the more determined to show the other side of the story.
Ending the film was tricky. We wanted more than anything for Jagged to go on national television and be a success because we truly believe what they do is art and is incredible! But after their experience on America’s Got Talent, we came to see that this is a movement that is making in roads one person at a time. And we realized that through the journey of watching the film and seeing Jagged’s journey, audiences see that just by changing their mind Jagged has been successful.

O’LRL: The mesmerizing images of the opening title sequence served as a strong touchstone for the artistic nature of the dance work.  When in the filmmaking process did you decide to shoot that sequence?  Can you talk about your choice to run a Kickstarter campaign to help make that possible? 

KC: When we started editing the film, we realized that seeing Jagged perform would quickly establish for audiences what exactly pole dance has become. Their dance is worth a thousand words, and we felt that the quicker we dispelled the biases the more engaged audiences would be. We’d always wanted to film the company in a controlled setting, and the opening of the film became the perfect reason to do it! 
Kickstarter was still relatively new at the time, and we were the first people we knew to run a campaign so it was definitely a leap of faith. But we had a lot of friends and family who knew about the project and was a way to get them involved. We did a ton of research and spent about 2 months planning the campaign. Luckily it all paid off!

O’LRL Any thoughts you’d like to share with other filmmakers about the joys and challenges of sharing the directing and producing roles with your life partner? 

KC: Working with my husband is truly a gift. There is really nothing like getting to make your dreams come to life with the person you love. 
Being creative partners has made our personal relationship a million times stronger. We got married in the midst of making the film and it was the best lesson in learning how to be successful life partners. You have to communicate, you have to listen, you have to be patient, and at the end of the day you have to go sleep in the same bed, so you better figure out how to resolve your differences.
We heard Judd Apatow say once that as a couple you are always one fight away from never fighting again and it’s so true. Like every couple we have ‘that fight we always have.’ Ours is both of us saying the same thing but debating who said it better. It makes our friends roll their eyes every time we do it, because we are saying the exact same thing. At least now we’ll stop in the middle and go “Are we having that fight we always have?” It diffuses the situation and kind of makes us laugh. The truth is the more passionate we are about what ever we are fighting about, the more we both care. And I think we see that now.
Seriously though, we are only one fight away from never fighting again.

O’LRL: I’m sure there’s a fun story behind your company name Butter&Sugar? Care to share?

KC: When not making films we are cooking, eating, or tracking down something new and fun to eat. Food is a great hobby because you have to eat, might as well make it interesting! We often cook for our friends, and one night Matt made a chicken for one of our friends, Ben. He was at first amazed it tasted like a restaurant chicken and then was appalled to discover the reason was because Matt did what restaurants do which is put a bunch of butter on the outside to crisp the skin and make it delicious. So Ben started calling Matt ‘Butter.’ Ben also is love with my chocolate cream pie, so I soon became ‘Sugar.’ The rest was kind of history (thanks Ben!) It’s a good reminder to not take ourselves too seriously.

O’LRL: What’s next on your filmmaking horizon?

KC: We are currently working on few projects. Right now we’re in the middle of developing a show tentatively titled “The Dying Art” about artists who practice dying art forms such as darkroom printing and stone lithography. Matt’s spearheading this with one of our frequent collaborators Keith Lancaster, and it’s really exploring the spirit of the people who continue these forms that more and more are becoming forgotten by the general public. Together we are also in the early stages of developing a show about the new modern food scene in Los Angeles (clearly right up our alley). 
My favorite part of making the documentary was structuring the story and crafting the character arc. I discovered my love of writing, and so to work on that I am currently in the Professional Screenwriting Program at UCLA. If there’s anything you learn in making a project as ambitious as a documentary, it’s that you are never done learning. It’s a new challenge to work on a narrative piece and how to bring that to life, but I’m really enjoying it.
In making Off The Floor, we found that we’re drawn to stories of dreamers and outsiders. While we were editing the film, we had a phrase printed out in giant words above the computer with the theme of the film: “Passion overcomes even the harshest critics”. I think that’s a theme we love to explore and these new projects are taking everything we learned making this film and applying it forward.

O’LRL: Thanks for taking time to share with O’Leary’s Reel Life.  Have a great time at Heartland Film Festival.View the Heartland Film Festival’s website for additional screening dates and to acquire tickets. 
Off the Floor: @poledanceisart

INSIGHTS into upcoming films at Heartland Film Festival…

Katie and Matt Celia are coming to Indianapolis to share their  documentary OFF THE FLOOR with Heartland Film Festival goers: Saturday, Oct. 18 – 5:00 pm, AMC Traders Point Showplace 12. 

"The Celias (aka Butter&Sugar) are a husband & wife film-making team who love telling stories about dreamers and outsiders.”

"This is the inspiring true story of one dancer, Jessica Anderson-Gwin, and her struggle to find acceptance and respect for her art. Jessica and her dance company, Jagged, challenge audiences to embrace the artistic potential of vertical dance, a fusion of aerial pole fitness and traditional dance techniques."

This week Katie Celia took time out from packing and travel preparation to share some insights about co-creating the film with her husband and co-director/producer Matt.  Here’s what she had to share…

O’LRL: I read that you were inspired to create OFF THE FLOOR after attending the very first performance of Jagged’s innovative hybrid modern dance/pole dance work and being surprised by what you experienced. Can you share about the process of recognizing there was a documentary waiting to be born? How did the two of you explore the idea together and how did you reach out to Jessica Anderson-Gwin and the troupe to convince them to let you in to their world?

KC: Going into the show we had no idea we were about to see the subject of a documentary, we went simply to support a friend of mine who was in the show. But we knew right away that very night that this was something incredible. It was like being in the ocean and seeing the perfect wave forming in front of you. After the first dance number, Matt and I turned to each other and it was clear the light bulb had illuminated over both our heads. We were just so intrigued at the way Jessica had seamlessly combined two dance styles that we would have thought were contradictory but turned out to actually be very complimentary. As artists, we saw the vision it took to make that leap and were astonished we’d never seen it before. It’s rare to stumble on something new and fresh.

There really wasn’t much discussion, we were so curious and interested in the company that we had my friend get us into the wrap party that night and approached Jessica then and there. Of course as first time filmmakers we didn’t know where that road was going to lead, or that it would turn into a feature. We just thought she had an interesting story and perspective and wanted to see where it lead us.

Jessica is the most inclusive person I’ve ever met. She loves showing people her world because she is confident in who she is and the choices she makes. It’s one of the reasons you fall in love with her both in person and in the film. We talked to her the night of the show, took her out for pizza to get a little more backstory, and by our third meeting were filming rehearsals. She really didn’t need convincing. I think some of the other dancers were a little confused the first time we showed up because she forgot to tell them we were coming, but being performers they were fine with the camera being there.

O’LRL: OFF THE FLOOR at its heart feels like a story about tenacity in the face of seemingly insurmountable odds.  As the dance troupe struggled to shape their artistic vision and battle the strip club stigma were there ever times when you worried that the situation would implode leaving you without a satisfying arc for your documentary?  What kept you going? And what signaled to you that it was time to complete the film?

KC: Being around Jessica, you just can’t help but believe that one day pole dance will be as accepted as ballet and hip-hop. I know that sounds crazy, but her confidence is just that infectious. I think it was always shocking to us when that stigma would rear its ugly, because we couldn’t believe that others didn’t see pole dance the way we saw it. The funny thing is, it’s never during their self-produced show with live audiences where there’s a problem with perception. Yes, initially there’s this awed silence of people holding their breath, trying to comprehend what is going on, but soon you see the preconceptions melt away and then you have folks cheering and pulling out their phones to take photos and videos because it’s the coolest thing they’ve ever seen. We’ve seen it happen over and over again, and there’s never been an audience they haven’t won over. It’s on mainstream media where the stigma tends to come up, and that’s because it’s much easier to play the salacious angle then to dive deeper and show how pole has evolved. It was very frustrating to witness that disconnect. It made us all the more determined to show the other side of the story.

Ending the film was tricky. We wanted more than anything for Jagged to go on national television and be a success because we truly believe what they do is art and is incredible! But after their experience on America’s Got Talent, we came to see that this is a movement that is making in roads one person at a time. And we realized that through the journey of watching the film and seeing Jagged’s journey, audiences see that just by changing their mind Jagged has been successful.

O’LRL: The mesmerizing images of the opening title sequence served as a strong touchstone for the artistic nature of the dance work.  When in the filmmaking process did you decide to shoot that sequence?  Can you talk about your choice to run a Kickstarter campaign to help make that possible? 

KC: When we started editing the film, we realized that seeing Jagged perform would quickly establish for audiences what exactly pole dance has become. Their dance is worth a thousand words, and we felt that the quicker we dispelled the biases the more engaged audiences would be. We’d always wanted to film the company in a controlled setting, and the opening of the film became the perfect reason to do it! 

Kickstarter was still relatively new at the time, and we were the first people we knew to run a campaign so it was definitely a leap of faith. But we had a lot of friends and family who knew about the project and was a way to get them involved. We did a ton of research and spent about 2 months planning the campaign. Luckily it all paid off!

O’LRL Any thoughts you’d like to share with other filmmakers about the joys and challenges of sharing the directing and producing roles with your life partner? 

KC: Working with my husband is truly a gift. There is really nothing like getting to make your dreams come to life with the person you love. 

Being creative partners has made our personal relationship a million times stronger. We got married in the midst of making the film and it was the best lesson in learning how to be successful life partners. You have to communicate, you have to listen, you have to be patient, and at the end of the day you have to go sleep in the same bed, so you better figure out how to resolve your differences.

We heard Judd Apatow say once that as a couple you are always one fight away from never fighting again and it’s so true. Like every couple we have ‘that fight we always have.’ Ours is both of us saying the same thing but debating who said it better. It makes our friends roll their eyes every time we do it, because we are saying the exact same thing. At least now we’ll stop in the middle and go “Are we having that fight we always have?” It diffuses the situation and kind of makes us laugh. The truth is the more passionate we are about what ever we are fighting about, the more we both care. And I think we see that now.

Seriously though, we are only one fight away from never fighting again.

O’LRL: I’m sure there’s a fun story behind your company name Butter&Sugar? Care to share?

KC: When not making films we are cooking, eating, or tracking down something new and fun to eat. Food is a great hobby because you have to eat, might as well make it interesting! We often cook for our friends, and one night Matt made a chicken for one of our friends, Ben. He was at first amazed it tasted like a restaurant chicken and then was appalled to discover the reason was because Matt did what restaurants do which is put a bunch of butter on the outside to crisp the skin and make it delicious. So Ben started calling Matt ‘Butter.’ Ben also is love with my chocolate cream pie, so I soon became ‘Sugar.’ The rest was kind of history (thanks Ben!) It’s a good reminder to not take ourselves too seriously.

O’LRL: What’s next on your filmmaking horizon?

KC: We are currently working on few projects. Right now we’re in the middle of developing a show tentatively titled “The Dying Art” about artists who practice dying art forms such as darkroom printing and stone lithography. Matt’s spearheading this with one of our frequent collaborators Keith Lancaster, and it’s really exploring the spirit of the people who continue these forms that more and more are becoming forgotten by the general public. Together we are also in the early stages of developing a show about the new modern food scene in Los Angeles (clearly right up our alley). 

My favorite part of making the documentary was structuring the story and crafting the character arc. I discovered my love of writing, and so to work on that I am currently in the Professional Screenwriting Program at UCLA. If there’s anything you learn in making a project as ambitious as a documentary, it’s that you are never done learning. It’s a new challenge to work on a narrative piece and how to bring that to life, but I’m really enjoying it.

In making Off The Floor, we found that we’re drawn to stories of dreamers and outsiders. While we were editing the film, we had a phrase printed out in giant words above the computer with the theme of the film: “Passion overcomes even the harshest critics”. I think that’s a theme we love to explore and these new projects are taking everything we learned making this film and applying it forward.

O’LRL: Thanks for taking time to share with O’Leary’s Reel Life.  Have a great time at Heartland Film Festival.

View the Heartland Film Festival’s website for additional screening dates and to acquire tickets. 

Off the Floor: @poledanceisart

Off the Floor documentary katie celia Heartland Film Festival interview dance modern dance pole dance matt celia mixed gender directing team woman director DirectedbyWomen festival film filmmaking

Evolution of a Criminal screened at #IUCinema last night. Documentarian Darius Clark Monroe was in attendance to talk with the audience about his autobiographical documentary exploring issues surrounding his experiences as a high school kid set on alleviating his family’s finanical hardships by holding up a bank, his subsequent incarceration and eventual film study at NYU, which led to the creation of the film.

The documentary blends interviews with reenactments of the events surrounding the bank robbery. The solid performances Monroe elicited from the actors involved in the reenactments makes me eager to see the narrative feature he is turning his attention to next. 

I appreciated IU Associate Professor Terri Francis' skillful facilitation of the Q&A.  

Monroe will be available via Skype for screenings of the film at Woodburn 101 through The Ryder film series this weekend. PBS will be broadcasting the film on Independent Lens and screening it around the country at various locations.  Schedule here.  


IU Cinema darius clark monroe terri francis evolution of a criminal pbs independent lens documentary bank robbery Q&A ryder film series NYU film school autobiography crime

INSIGHTS into upcoming films at Heartland Film Festival…

One of the most exciting features of a vibrant film festival is the opportunity to engage in dialogue with filmmakers about their creative process. Heartland Film Festival makes it easy to pinpoint which screenings will be enhanced by the presence of the filmmakers themselves with their handy Filmmaker & Talent Schedule

DRUNKTOWN’S FINEST
directed by Sydney Freeland

Sydney Freeland, writer/director of Drunktown’s Finest, is among this year’s guest filmmakers festival goers will have the chance to connect with. She’ll be at screenings on October 17 and 18.

"Navajo writer/director Sydney Freeland began the journey to create Drunktown’s Finest in 2005, when she decided to take up the task of crafting an on-screen story that would accurately represent the variety of lifestyles present on the reservation she called home. Inspired by films such as Alejandro González Iñárritu’s Amores Perros, Sydney chose to create characters that reflected three dissimilar cultures found in her backyard – the macho, the LGBT, and the religious." DRUNKTOWN’S FINEST WEBSITE
..

I appreciate a film that lingers in my mind, inviting me to consider the characters, the complications they faced, and the choices they’ve made. Drunktown’s Finest exploration of identity, discovery of unanticipated allies, and new ways of experiencing traditions and family offered me a rich experience. The camera work welcomed me into the world of the Navajo reservation. The stories unfolded naturally grounded by strong performances all around.   

I don’t want to tell you ABOUT the film.  I invite you instead to experience it for yourself.  Allow its nuances to resonate without having to fight their way past preconceptions. Experience the individuals and go with them on their journeys.

I’m looking forward to seeing the film again later this week to see it on the big screen and hear what Freeland has to say about the creative process and where she’s putting her energies next.  I know I’ll be on the lookout to see her next film.

Hope to see you at the festival.

munay,

Barbara Ann O’Leary

Drunktown's Finest Sydney Freeland Heartland Film Festival filmmaker woman director DirectedbyWomen

INSIGHTS into upcoming films at Heartland Film Festival…

High School sophomore Carol Nguyen charmed the Heartland Film Festival audience last year with this acceptance speech where she thanked her good friend “duct tape” without whose help she would not have been able to make her award winning film “Uprooted,” a stop motion animated film “recounting Carol’s father’s journey to get to Canada from Vietnam.”

I was deeply moved by Uprooted:

I made a note to myself to keep an eye on this talented young woman filmmaker’s work going forward.  I’m delighted that her newest short film “How Do You Pronounce Pho?” will be part of Heartland Film Festival this year. Nguyen is scheduled to be present for the screening on Friday October 17th.

I have yet to see it, but am hoping to be there to see what she has created.  Join us if you can make it.

Heartland Film Festival Carol Nguyen High School Film Festival stop motion animation acceptance speech Uprooted How Do You Pronounce Pho? DirectedbyWomen

INSIGHTS into upcoming films at Heartland Film Festival…

CICADA directed by Dean Yamada

I found Cicada to be a beautiful film, filled with rich invitations to look deeply and shift focus to what has heart and meaning.  

I’m so glad to hear that director Dean Yamada will be in attendance for Q&As. Reading the interview Yamada did with Heartland Film Festival in anticipation of the film’s screenings, I was delighted to discover that it was made with a crew of film students.  What a rich experience that must have been for them!  

"As with cicadas, there is a shedding of the skin, a transformation that occurs within each of us when we step outside of ourselves."

I hope many people take the time to experience Cicada. I’m looking closely at my calendar to find a time to revisit this film during one of the 4 screenings Oct 17 - 19 when Director Dean Yamada will be present.

While you wait, check out Yamada’s short film Jitensha which won Heartland’s Vision Award in 2009:

Follow the Cicada Tumblr…

Heartland Film Festival festival Cicada Tokyo Japan magical realism family